Western media: Net red, don’t easily ta as a friend…

2022-06-04 0 By

“No, the influencers you follow are not your friends,” wrote Mait Rius in an article published on The website of La Vanguardia on January 17. The article said that sometimes people think of interactions with influencers as a kind of friendship, and this idea can be harmful.The isolation, loneliness and lack of real social contact during containment has sparked an upsurge in the use of social media and virtual interaction.This has led to a significant increase in one-way and quasi-social relationships.This kind of relationship refers to that ordinary people regard figures in mass media as real people and form a kind of interpersonal relationship with them similar to that established in face-to-face communication.This is starting to worry psychologists and educators.”I was so concerned about this that I started a topic on Instagram, because in my clinics, I see more and more people who see the Internet and influencers as their window to the world, who feel lonely and want to fill the void in their hearts by following them.””Says gabriela Paoli, a psychologist.She stresses that this is not just a problem she has observed among teenagers, “but also among adults and high-level professionals, especially women.”According to a survey by Russia’s Kaspersky Lab, 62 percent of Spaniards admitted that social media had provided them with important relationship support during the pandemic, up to 76 percent of young people aged 18 to 34.More than half admitted to increasing their use of social media, especially women.More than a third of these social media users follow influencers, and three-quarters of them interact with them, comment on their posts, send them a private message (25 percent) or go live to see them (22 percent).What’s more, one in five people think they could be “good friends” with an Internet celebrity.That’s the problem, psychologists and educators warn, is that people view interactions with influencers as a kind of friendship, and that can be harmful.”This relationship is usually occurs when you lie on the couch, when you’re bored or need to share, you will make you smile, happy with that or cry, do you think you and he see the world in the same way, do you think of him in those moments with you, do you think, ‘he is my close people,’ ‘he’s my friend, and this will allow you to get lost.”Explains psychologist Nacho Kohler.Kohler points out that relationships with influencers are asymmetrical and one-way. “Even if they ‘like’ or reply to one of your comments, you can’t expect them to be your friend or assume that they will form a special relationship with you or do something together.”Pauly stressed that fans often argue that they have a genuine connection to the influencer, but the responses they receive are often automated or made by professionals who manage celebrities’ social media accounts.Cognitive biases in how our brains work can also lead to misjudgments about relationships.”Influencers create something in psychology we call the halo effect: if an influencer with a lot of followers says something is important, people assume what they say is true.Confirmation bias also plays a role, as people often follow those who align with their lifestyle or values.These influences mean that what influencers say has a big impact on their fans.”Kohler points out.Beren Gonzalez-Larrea is an educational psychologist and co-founder of the NeuroClass platform.This quasi-social identity, he notes, is particularly alarming when it comes to teenagers.”During the teenage years, people are developing their self-identity, and those Internet celebrities, who benefit from the characteristics of their words or articles, will be seen by teenagers as close, attractive and accessible, and they will be considered opinion leaders.What they say, the values and beliefs they advocate, the way they see the world, all become part of teenagers’ self-perception, and influencers often don’t realize the effect this has on young people.”Gonzalez-larrea said.